Saturday, January 05, 2008

Traditional Mass returns to St Birinus

Low Mass, celebrated by the PP Fr John Osman himself, is now celebrated each Saturday at 9.30am. The church is remarkable and well worth a visit: see my longer post in the New Liturgical Movement here. Of particular note is the the remarkable rood screen, which with the East-facing altar survived the post-conciliar iconoclasm intact, is being repainted and regilded, and the rood itself only came back from the restorers last week.

It is wonderful to see Fr Osman's restoration of the church nearing completion, and it is a particularly great joy to see the Traditional liturgy back in regular use in this splendid church. I was privileged to serve at this Mass myself, and I hope in the near future to bring my schola to this church for a Missa Cantata.

1 comment:

  1. Joseph12:53 pm

    Readers may be interested in this comment on my NLM post, by Alan Robinson, who used to live and worship in Oxford and now lives in Ireland:

    This church has a few interesting links with Tradition. In the late 1960s and 1970s the Parih priest was Fr Gordon Bankes, a late vocation priest and an early supporter,as P.P. of Msgr Lefebvre, who he ivited on one of his first trips to England, to celebrate Mass at St Birinus. Canadian readers might like to know that the late Fr Donald Neilson celebrated Mass in the traditional rite on several days when visiting England in 1988.
    Fr Guy Nicols Cong Orat (Birmingham) began the "restoration" in 1988, following a rather forward looking priest who had chopped off bits of the rood screen, but had hidden them in the Priest's House. Fr Nicols did a fine job and re-instituted Solemn Benediction [in Latin] on Sunday evenings and frequently offered Mass,with traditional ceremony in the New rite in Latin. There is a big slice of traditionalist Catholic history in this tiny church.
    Alan Robinson

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